Perhaps she shouldn’t have let Kevin take her home—

I mean, he could be a creep.

THE GUY AT THE POETRY READING BY ELLEN BLOOMENSTEIN 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 65


Kevin reached for Melinda’s hand and held it. He leaned across the table and kissed her softly on the lips. “Let’s get outta here! Hey, I’ll take you home!” Kevin waved down a cab on 3rd Avenue. “What’s your address?”

Melinda hesitated, “Oh, right—well, it’s Madison and 32nd Street.” “Great. So that’s where we’re going, driver.” Melinda had a rule to never get too close on a first date. She had a fleeting thought that perhaps she shouldn’t have agreed to let Kevin take her home—I mean, he could be a creep—she really didn’t know him. Then again, she looked over at him and thought how handsome he looked. He must be a good guy, she reasoned.

She is a stranger in a faraway place, 

and she is welcomed home.

THE WATER’S EDGE BY FLAVIA BRUNETTI 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 65

She missed the shot, 

but we clapped and hollered anyways.

HONEY EYES BY LAUREN JOHNSTON 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 65


I’m ready for what’s next—whatever that is.

PROCESS BY DAVID HANS WARNER 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 65


When you live outside of ordinary life.

FIRST TIME IN PARIS BY CHARLOTTE ROSSLER 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 65



34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 65

THE WATER’S EDGE BY FLAVIA BRUNETTI, PROCESS BY DAVID HANS WARNER, THE GUY AT THE POETRY READING BY ELLEN BLOOMENSTEIN, HONEY EYES BY LAUREN JOHNSTON, FIRST TIME IN PARIS BY CHARLOTTE ROSSLER, ON CAIRO SCAMS BY DAVID WINNER, BURYING GRANDDADDY BY JOHN ALLISON


FLAVIA BRUNETTI 

I moved from Rome  to Tunis, and it changed everything for me. It was the thing I was maybe most scared of—a complete unknown, both culturally and professionally, also because I would be leaving a job I knew I loved for something I was entirely uncertain of. The first month I was here I was so forlorn that I had to sit on my hands to keep from going to the airport and running back to Rome. Truth be told, I did run back, at the end of my first working week, but by Sunday I got back on the plane and returned to Tunis. Three years have gone by since then, and I’ve spent a lot more time passing through the Tunis Carthage Airport, but now, when I land here, I’m also returning home. 

flaviinrome.com
Instagram@whichwaytorome






























ELLEN BLOOMENSTEIN

I was thinking about connections when I was writing this piece. I was thinking about missed connections and connections that come about by fate. Short-lived connections and connections that last. And, of course, the outcome of romantic connections.

I have an MFA in Fiction and Poetry from the New School and an undergraduate degree in Fine Art. I have self-published a novel and novella. My stories and poetry have been published online and in journals. I work as a copywriter in New York City.


CHARLOTTE ROSSLER

Writing seduces me. I get lost in it every day, and when I finally come up for air, I feel I just came out of a trance.

First Time in Paris is an excerpt from my memoir, Pandora’s Secrets. I’ve been writing a memoir for years. My journey through life, the adventures and adversities, might help others realize that surviving life’s early challenges could provide them the strength and hope to overcome pitfalls in their future. 

My educational background includes college courses in creative writing, workshops and writing groups, a BA in Organizational Management, and a professional certificate in Court Reporting. 

ms.charlotte.rossler@gmail.com

charlotterossler.com


DAVID WINNER

Before my father’s aunt, Dorle Soria, was a figure in the classical music world helping launch both Callas and Bernstein, she was an enthusiastic orientalist. I can’t think about the Arab world without seeing her as a young woman (entranced by Scheherazade as a child) accompanying one of her many lovers on a blood-drenched Syrian gazelle hunt. The idea was dreadful to me. Gazelles were beautiful and to hunt them in cars not particularly sportsmanlike. But it turned out to be most exciting.

My work has been published in The Village Voice, The Iowa Review, The Kenyon Review, Fiction, Confrontation, Joyland, Bookforum, and Dream Catcher and Staple in Britain. I am the fiction editor of The American, a magazine based in Rome, a contributing editor at Statorec.com, and a regular contributor to The Brooklyn Rail. I’ve published two novels, The Cannibal of Guadalajara and Tyler’s Last.

david-winner.com


JOHN ALLISON

Although Burying Granddaddy is fiction, it does draw on several elements from the life of my maternal grandfather who was, to say the least, a complicated man. Moreover, the story’s setting bears some resemblance to the place where I grew up, and from which I fled quickly upon turning 18. I did not leave anything behind and took almost nothing with me. I did, naturally, return periodically to visit the parents I had done such a great job of selecting, although not as often as I should have.

As an academic at the University of Texas at Austin, I have published widely on intellectual property, particularly data-driven studies of the patent system. I hope I am not as boring as that sounds. At the same time, I hope colleagues do not view my fiction publications as merely a continuation of the research I did for many years. I began writing stories several years ago after promising myself for decades that I would, and since 2016 I have published short fiction in Mount Hope, The Wagon, Forge, and now twice in the 34thParallel Magazine.

34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE 34THPARALLEL@GMAIL.COM